Manchester Public Schools
Office of Equity and Partnerships
12-18 Months - How you can support your child
By doing these 8 things, you can help your child grow physically, emotionally, socially, and cognitively…
Physical Growth
Social/Emotional Development
Brain Development
  1. Stay Calm
    Stay Calm
    Stay calm during tantrums. Tantrums can be overwhelming, but they are perfectly normal. When you stay calm (even if you need to give yourself a “time out”), you show your toddler that you are in charge and help her recover more quickly.
  2. Do Chores
    Do Chores
    Do household chores together. Your toddler is learning how your household works. You help him build new skills and feel helpful when you find ways for him to participate. Toddlers may like to put a shirt in the laundry basket or a bottle in recycling bin.
  3. Talk about Feelings
    Talk about Feelings
    Talk about feelings. You can help your child have empathy for others by showing that you can imagine what she is feeling and prompting her to imagine what others might be feeling.
  4. Teach Independence
    Teach Independence
    Encourage your child to do things herself, while teaching her how to ask for help. Toddlers are becoming more and more independent every day. You can help by letting your child practice new skills (like pouring over the sink) and asking her if she needs help if she seems frustrated.
  5. Read Books about Life
    Read Books about Life
    Read books about everyday things, like using the potty, going to the doctor, and staying with a babysitter. Reading books can help your child feel prepared for new experiences.
  6. Say Yes
    Say Yes
    Find creative ways to say “yes.” Saying “yes” when you can will help your toddler be more willing to accept it when you have to say “no”.
  7. Go Outside
    Go Outside
    Go outdoors. Your toddler has lots of physical energy. Help her get it out at a safe place like the park or the playground.
  8. Take Turns Talking
    Take Turns Talking
    Take turns talking and listening with their baby. Your baby is practicing the back and forth of conversation.
By eighteen months most children can... Walk without help. Use cup/spoon. Build tower. Scribble. Pretend. Hug/kiss. Help with dressing/undressing. Make people laugh. Point out things. Know what objects do. Understand simple requests. Say no. Know names of body parts. Combine sounds/gestures to communicate.


Remember: All babies are different, and every child develops at his or her own pace. However, you can talk to your child’s doctor if you are worried about your child’s development. Or call Connecticut Birth to Three ’s toll-free hotline to talk to someone about your concerns: 1-800-505-7000.
 
Additional Resources:
These free guides from the Center for Disease Control can help you talk to your child’s doctor about healthy growth and development.

Concerned About Development? How to Help Your Child
Concerned About Development? How to Talk with the Doctor
¿Le preocupa el desarrollo de su hijo? Cómo Ayudarlo
¿Está preocupado por el desarrollo? Cómo Hablar con el Médico
Click here for more resources including activities, support, and networking opportunities in Manchester.
Resources: Parent, Family, and Community Involvement in Education. NEA Education Policy and Practice Department. Center for Great Public Schools. 2008. Milestones compiled and adapted from: Developmental Milestones: Learn the Signs. Act Early. CDC 24/7: Saving Lives Protecting People. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 April 2015. Web. 3 Jan 2016. Ages and Stages: Your Child’s Development. ZERO TO THREE. National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families. 2008. Web. 3 Jan 2016. Ages and Stages. Healthy Children: Powered by Pediatricians. Trusted by Parents. 2016. American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. Web. 3 Jan 2016.
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