Manchester Public Schools
Office of Equity and Partnerships
3-6 Months - How you can support your child
By doing these 8 things, you can help your child grow physically, emotionally, socially, and cognitively…
Physical Growth
Social/Emotional Development
Brain Development
  1. Sleep on Back
    Sleep on Back
    Put your baby to sleep on her back, even for naps. Putting your baby to sleep on her back can help prevent accidental suffocation and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.
  2. Talk
    Talk
    Talk to your baby. Babies learn to talk by being spoken to. By six months, most babies will begin to respond to their name.
  3. Read
    Read
    Read to your baby. It’s never too early to start reading to your baby. At this age, it’s best to keep reading time short--just three minutes at a time is enough for a six-month old.
  4. Use Mirrors
    Use Mirrors
    Have fun with mirrors. By this age, babies eyes can distinguish colors and work together to show depth perception. Your baby will enjoy looking at the baby in the mirror.
  5. Make Faces
    Make Faces
    Make funny faces. At this age, your baby loves faces. Let her touch your face as you wiggle your eyebrow or puff out your cheeks.
  6. Show Baby the World
    Show Baby the World
    Show baby the world. The park, the grocery store, the post office--these are all new and exciting places to your baby. Taking your baby when you go on errands and talking about the world around him helps your baby learn new sights, sounds, and places.
  7. Tummy Time
    Tummy Time
    During “tummy time,” put an interesting object-a toy, a cup, a wooden spoon-just out their baby’s reach. Reaching for the object will help your baby develop the muscles he’ll later need to crawl.
  8. Bedtime Routine
    Bedtime Routine
    Create a bedtime routine. A simple routine-a bath, a book, a song-can help your baby know it’s time to settle down for the night. By this age, most-but not all-babies will begin sleeping eight hours at nights (and six more during daytime naps).
By six months most children can... Roll over. Reach for a toy. Pass a toy from one hand to another. Sit with help. Put toys to mouth. Respond to name. Make sounds to show happiness and unhappiness. Know when someone is a stranger. Enjoy playing. Like looking in the mirror. Make vowel sounds.

Remember: All babies are different, and every child develops at his or her own pace. However, you can talk to your child’s doctor if you are worried about your child’s development. Or call Connecticut Birth to Three ’s toll-free hotline to talk to someone about your concerns: 1-800-505-7000.
 
Additional Resources:
These free guides from the Center for Disease Control can help you talk to your child’s doctor about healthy growth and development.
Concerned About Development? How to Help Your Child
Concerned About Development? How to Talk with the Doctor
¿Le preocupa el desarrollo de su hijo? Cómo Ayudarlo
¿Está preocupado por el desarrollo? Cómo Hablar con el Médico
Click here for more resources including activities, support, and networking opportunities in Manchester.
Resources: Parent, Family, and Community Involvement in Education. NEA Education Policy and Practice Department. Center for Great Public Schools. 2008. Milestones compiled and adapted from: Developmental Milestones: Learn the Signs. Act Early. CDC 24/7: Saving Lives Protecting People. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 April 2015. Web. 3 Jan 2016. Ages and Stages: Your Child’s Development. ZERO TO THREE. National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families. 2008. Web. 3 Jan 2016. Ages and Stages. Healthy Children: Powered by Pediatricians. Trusted by Parents. 2016. American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. Web. 3 Jan 2016.
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